Is your foam roller collecting dust? Or, maybe you’re just not quite sure what to do with it? Give these exercises a try:🪄static chest opening stretch: lay on the foam roller so your tailbone and head are supported. Open arms straight out to the side or for a more intense stretch with elbows bent in a🌵shape. 🪄thoracic mobility: place the foam roller just below the shoulder blades horizontally and do a small “crunch” with back bend. You can also loosen up the muscles running along the length of the spine by rolling back and forth as shown in the second video 🎥. 🪄 abdominal strengthening: take your usual ab exercise and make it more challenging by doing it on an unstable surface. The position of your arms will change your stability too. Bent arms 💪🏻will be more challenging. Now that you’ve broken a sweat 😓 and stretched and massaged that mid back, let us know what you think! Got any other favorite exercises with a foam roller we missed?? Let us know 👇🏼PS. More videos and pictures on our Instagram @ptforpelvichealth. Check them out!! ... See MoreSee Less
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Last post we discussed the pelvic floor myth that having a c-section means your pelvic floor won’t need any rehab after delivery. Today we want to give you a few ideas for exercises you can do shortly after your cesarean to address your core and pelvic floor. Diaphragmatic Breathing:✨ How: inhale through the nose, allow belly to rise, pelvic floor to open and rib cage to expand✨ Why: helps improve pelvic floor and diaphragm proprioceptionClam shells:✨ How: lie on your side with knees bent. Exhale as you lift your knee just past hip level. Inhale to lower. Repeat on opposite side. ✨ Why: glute medius and external hip rotation help support pelvic floor muscles. Bridges:✨ How: lie on your back knees bent. Exhale lift your hips from the ground. Stay in a pain free range - no tugging on your incision should be felt. ✨ Why: glute max also is an accessory muscle supporting the pelvic floor. Pelvic Floor Contractions:(No video because when you do these right, no one will be able to tell!) ✨ How: exhale as you close and lift your pelvic muscles. Aiming to engage about 50%. Inhale fully to relax and release the muscles. ✨ Why: contracting 50% will help ensure you don’t excessively engage your abdominal muscles.Remember to follow your doctor’s orders and know these exercises are typically safe assuming there were no complications with your delivery. If in doubt, give your local pelvic PT a call. She will be able to provide you specific exercises to address your particular needs and concerns. ... See MoreSee Less
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In honor of c-section awareness month, let’s do a little pelvic floor myth busting! 🤓Your pelvic floor plays an important role in stabilizing our pelvis and supporting our pelvic organs (and a growing babe). 🤰🏻During pregnancy and after, we become even more reliant on these muscles thanks to the changes from all those circulating pregnancy hormones (thanks, relaxin 😖). Oh, and those hormones? They can continue circulating at higher than pre-pregnancy levels up to 6 months after delivery or longer if you breastfeed. 😯You wouldn’t neglect your abs if you had a vaginal delivery, so don’t neglect your pelvic floor just because you had a cesarean. 💪🏻Not sure where to start? Check back next week for a few ideas! ... See MoreSee Less
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I often field calls from prospective new patients who want to know if we offer biofeedback (yes, we do by the way 🙃). For those folks that like to do their research, they see that the literature 📚supports biofeedback as one of the most effective forms of treatment for a number of pelvic floor conditions. What is biofeedback anyway??Biofeedback is a way of gaining greater body awareness and control with the help of external feedback. Sometimes that involves a fancy machine, sometimes it’s simply a tactile cue — a fancy way of saying touch. 👈🏻Even if you didn’t realize it, you likely have done a form of biofeedback with your physical therapist, but if you ever have questions — ask!! Knowledge is power 🤓, and you always have the right to better understand the treatment approach you physical therapist (or any doctor for that matter) is using. ... See MoreSee Less
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“Speeze” (n): when sneezing and leaking happens at the same time. If this is you every spring (thanks, pollen 🙄), it’s time to call your local pelvic floor physical therapist. Sure, leaking is common. In fact, some studies show 75% of women will experience leaking at some point. 👀 But, just because it’s common, doesn’t mean you have to live with it. Medically speaking, there are different ways to address leaking with surgery and medications. The good news is those aren’t your only options! Give your local pelvic floor PT a call and learn more about how they can help you - no surgery required! ... See MoreSee Less
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